Tuesday, 21 May 2019

More Of Derbyshire And A Bit Of Family History

Following on from my last post, after we'd visited Matlock Bath and Caudwell's Mill & Craft Centre we headed off to the ancient capital of the Peak District, Bakewell.


We parked by the River Wye and crossed Weir Bridge.


The railings on this bridge are now just about full of padlocks, a tradition started by lovers fastening 'love locks' on the Pont des Arts in Paris.


There must be thousands of padlocks adorning the bridge.



Bakewell is a busy town but it still retains its character and charm.


Home of the Bakewell Pudding, there are many bakeries selling this flaky pastry dessert.


We had a wander around the town before getting back in the car and setting off once again. We stopped to enjoy the view at Monsal Head, high above Monsal Dale where the viaduct which carried the former Midland Railway over the river can be seen.



It's quite a few years now since I've worked on my family tree but generations of my mum's family came from Derbyshire. I know that my mum's grandparents are buried in the churchyard at a village called Stanton so we decided we'd go and see if we could find their headstones.

Stanton is a small village on the Weaver Hills near Ashbourne. Each generation of my mum's family were born there from at least the 1780's when my great great great great grandfather was born, right down to my my mum's mum who was born there in 1909. It was a bit of a drive but eventually we came upon the church.


It's only a small church and there aren't a great number of graves as it's relatively new, being built in 1847. Prior to that, the villagers worshipped at Ellastone, a village about two and a half miles away so some family occasions such as christenings, weddings and funerals took place there. It didn't take us long until we found my mum's Uncle Henry, or Harry as he was known.


I was really pleased that we discovered my great grandparents, William and Louisa. We only decided to look for the church on the spur of the moment, if I'd known we'd be visiting I'd have taken some flowers. There's a misspelling on the stone, Louisa has been spelt Lousia.


And here is a photo of Louisa, kindly passed on to me from a relative who I found when researching my family tree. I don't know when the photo was taken but Louisa was born in 1871.


The village is in such a peaceful place, you can see for miles from the churchyard.


It's a shame that the church was locked as I'd have liked to have gone inside. I'm so pleased that we found it though, it really made my day.


I used to love to work on my family tree, discovering family history from long ago. Visiting the place where my great grandparents lived, and my nana lived as a child, has reawakened something in me and I'm all geared up again to discover more. I can see this old hobby of mine being rekindled, and I'd love to go and explore this area more and perhaps visit Ellastone church too.

32 comments:

  1. What an excellent trip, it brings so much colour to your family tree investigations to have found the place where they lived.

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    1. It's fascinating researching the family tree, thinking of all those who have gone before us. Being able to actually see the places they lived brings it all to life.

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  2. Aah Bakewell - another of my favourites! Never been to Stanton but it looks lovely and I'm really pleased for you that you found some missing pieces to your family tree. There's nothing as good as getting out into the countryside!

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    1. Bakewell is such a lovely place. It's always very busy when we go but it still manages to cling on to its charm. Visiting Stanton was the highlight of my day, I've heard so much about it from the family so it was lovely to visit at last.

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  3. I started tracing my family tree quite a few years ago and got quite absorbed in it. It's fascinating to find out about all those people in our family that we never got to meet. There are quite a few characters in mine and I discovered a few funny stories. None of my family moved very far from the area where I live now, (except a cousin who moved to South Africa). One day when I have more time I might get back into it.

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    1. It's so easy to get absorbed in researching the family tree, I've lost hours once I've got engrossed in a particular fact that I'm looking for. My dad's line of the family have always lived in Leeds since the 1700's, I got a bit stuck there and haven't been able to get any further back yet. My mum's family come from Derbyshire on one side and Northamptonshire on one of the other branches. It is time consuming chasing up all the leads but it's a very rewarding hobby.

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  4. I've been to Bakewell and loved the town. How lovely for you to have found the churchyard and your relatives gravestones. The photo of Louisa is something to treasure, she was very pretty. I have been doing my own family tree and discovered some amazing facts. I found a distant relative who took his large family to Australia and left one daughter behind. She married and emigrated a few years later with her husband and two small daughters and the ship was lost at sea. Dreadful to see their names on the passenger list and the story in an Australian newspaper of the time. I hope you do start up your research again, it's a great pastime.

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    1. Bakewell's a lovely place, there's some wonderful towns and villages in Derbyshire. I was thrilled to find the church in Stanton, it's popped up so many times when researching my mum's side of the family so it was lovely to actually visit it at last. I've met quite a few distant relatives whilst researching the tree and they've been able to provide me with photos, I'm so grateful as no one I know had one of Louisa and I've even been given photos of my great great grandparents on my dad's side of the family. What a sad story to find in your own family tree, unfortunately it isn't only the happy things we discover, terribly sad.

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  5. Your trip brings memories of our trip around the area a few years ago, it's quite a trip for us from Hampshire.
    How wonderful to find the resting place of your family, my neice has done a family tree, she loves researching everyone.

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    1. I'm pleased you've been able to see Derbyshire for yourself, it's a lovely county with so much beauty. It was lovely to visit the church, it's a shame it was locked though. I'd definitely like to go back and visit the church in Ellastone as I'm sure there's more there to discover.

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  6. What a wonderful trip and so interesting to find your relatives and think of how their lives were led in the times. I too share your passion for ancestry and agree many an hour has passed researching, but always facinating. I hope you enjoy your rekindled interest xcx

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    1. It's such a lovely place but quite remote, I can imagine the hardships that my ancestors endured, but beautiful all the same. I'm on a mission now to find out more.

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  7. How wonderful to have found that church and graveyard! I'm not sure what it is, but I too love seeing these bits of family history. When we were in Portugal, we visited the graveyard where many of my mom's relatives are buried. It's sort of a sad yet joyful moment at the same time.

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    1. I'm thrilled that we found the church, we've been saying for such a long time that we must go. I'm really pleased that my brother took my mum there a few years ago now when she was in better health and she too visited her grandparent's grave. You've described the exact feelings, it feel joyous to be treading the same path as our relatives that have gone before us but sad too, I'd have loved to have known them.

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  8. How wonderful, to be able to go to places, from your family History!!!! With ours, our family has only been here, for a couple of generations.

    They came, became citizens, and worked hard. By now, it's the norm, for their offspring to be college educated. Can be very proud of mine, who came over on a boat, followed the Rules of their New Country, and lived a good, hard-working life here.

    To go "see" back farther, would entail, traveling to Ireland, Scotland, Germany and Austria. Something, I'm never going to be able to do.

    That locks of love craze. I don't agree. Seems silly to me, and it certainly isn't good, for the bridge structure.

    Just me.... :-)

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    1. I'm lucky that my family all seem to have stayed close to where they were born, this branch especially, and it's not all that far from where I live now, less than a hundred miles. It's a shame that you can't actually see where your ancestors came from but they'll have fascinating stories which, now we've got the internet, are much easier to find out about. I don't mind the love locks, it's just a bit of fun. The only problem, as you say, is if it's damaging the bridge.

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  9. What a lovely trip. Bakewell looks lovely, as does the surrounding area of Stanton.
    And how wonderful to discover some family graves. It must be fascinating to research your family tree. X

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    1. Derbyshire is such a picturesque county, so much countryside and beautiful views. Family history is so interesting, it's addictive once you get started on it. I got back to the 1700's on most branches of my tree but became a bit stuck so I put it to one side but I'd like to get back to it now and discover more.

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  10. Good post and lovely pictures. Nice to see that you found the headstones. Family history is a fascinating subject which often turns up something unexpected. xx

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    1. I knew my great grandparent's graves were in the churchyard as my mum visited them a few years ago with my brother but it was nice to see them for myself. The things I've discovered through researching my fammily tree are amazing, it's such a fascinating thing to do, I really want to get back to it now.

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  11. Sometimes the spur of the moment trips turn out to be the best. How lovely to find the graves of your family. Louisa looks a very striking lady.

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    1. I agree, we had no idea where we'd end up when we set off but it was a wonderful day out. I'm really pleased to have a photo of Louisa.

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  12. What a poignant day out and also finding your grandparents headstone. The love locks look so pretty on the bridge, but there's been a lot of debate around the world about love locks and many countries ow have dedicated places where people can attach them safely without causing harm to bridges or life. Your great-grandma is a very pretty girl. My Grandad Williams ( my dad's dad ) was born in 1885 and my dad is now 81, having been born in 1937 when his dad was 52. My dad thinks it's amusing that his dad was born over 130 years ago! Best, Jane x

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    1. There must be thousands of love locks on this bridge, many more than was there when we last visited. I find family history fascinating. How different the world must have been when your grandad was born.

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  13. How wonderful to be able to find the headstones, you must have been delighted. My husband started to research our families and has really enjoyed the process. Is a pudding different from a tart? I have always associated Bakewell with tarts...

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    1. I was elated to find the headstones, it's like a connection with the past in a way. Researching the family tree is such an addictive hobby. I must admit that I've never tried Bakewell pudding, I just don't much like the look of it, but apparently it's a cakey sponge made with eggs, spread with jam and containing a ground almond filling whereas Bakewell tart is eggless and contains a fine almond based topping. Bakewell puddings are made using flaky pastry and Bakewwell puddings are made using shortcrust pastry. They do look quite different. Perhaps I'll buy one of each next time I'm in Bakewell and then I can show the difference.

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  14. I love the old photo, and the church and graveyard...some of my favorite places to visit. Love history, love family genealogy. How cool you got to visit there. The bridge with locks is interesting. Wonder how something like that got started.
    Sandy's Space

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    1. Family history is fascinating and all the more so when you can visit places where ancestors lived, it brings it all to life somehow. I love looking round churchyards anyway, I find the inscriptions on headstones really interesting.

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  15. Such a lovely post Jo.

    That is a lot of 'love locks', but so good to find your grandparents headstones, a very special and poignant day out.

    All the best Jan

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    1. I was surprised by the amount of love locks, so many more than when we last visited. It was a lovely day out, it somehow makes you feel connected to the past when you research your family tree and actually visit the places where your ancestors lived.

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  16. What a wonderful trip. I did enjoy finding out about your family history and seeing those old graves. Family history is always so fascinating, you never know what you are about to discover. xxx

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    1. I think that's the thing which is so fascinating, all the facts in your family's past which you never knew about, I love finding it all out.

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